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Schedule

Highlights of our Boston Conference

With your registration, you will receive the following:

  • The opportunity to attend 5 workshops on timely, professional topics (see A-Z workshop tab for descriptions)
  • The chance to hear from award-winning American novelist Gregory Maguire
  • school visits and tours:
  • 1 breakfast, 3 lunches, all you can eat snacks
  • "Hospitali-tea suite": complimentary coffee/tea 
  • Admission to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston (if you choose this optional outing)
  • Tour the recently renovated Boston Public Library 
  • Tour Fenway Park (if you choose this optional outing)
  • Optional Board Book Social (group book discussion)
  • Dinner with a Librarian - opportunity to get to know others in your profession (meal not included)
  • A delicious meal and program at the Skip Anthony Banquet
  • Not to mention hours and hours of professional networking with librarians from across the U.S. and Canada
Amazing Community Event and Fundraiser

Location: Milton Academy
Audience: 
Lower School, Middle School, Upper School
Presented by: 
Cheryl McClean, Library Department Chair; Courtney Walker, Middle Division Librarian; Kristi James, Library Assistant (Berkeley Preparatory School)

For the second time, the Jean Ann Cone Library is hosting a movie preview night, so that our upper school students can see a movie BEFORE it is released to the public. This event brought together 200 faculty and staff in a local theater that was all ours the night before the film was released. Our event is a break even event, but it could also be a fundraiser. Learn how to create and pull off what one of our teachers, who had been at Berkeley 40 years, called “the best community building event he had ever been to.” Participants will get all the tools to recreate the event at their schools: contacts, lists, lessons learned. 

Beyond the Books: How Reading Can Launch Teacher Collaboration and Community Partnerships

Location: Pike School
Audience: Lower School  
Presented by: Kim Martin, Lower School Library Media Specialist; Mia Kaplan, 4th Grade ELA (Isidore Newman School)

Reading has the power to inspire change, and the library can be the place where students feel empowered to work towards change. For the past few years at the Isidore Newman School, 4th Grade ELA teacher and the librarian have partnered on a service-learning project called the Animal Activism Endeavor. Using books as a springboard for inquiry, students use library resources to dive deeper into topics related to animal rights. We partner with the local SPCA to learn more about their work during several field trips and then spearhead fundraisers on campus to support their projects. Students develop leadership as they coordinate Special Furry Friends Day for the Lower School and visit classes to teach about the fair treatment of animals through literature. Takeaways: Service-learning resources, examples and models of service-learning projects, bibliography of books that can serve as a launching point for service projects, examples of Google Classroom and Edmodo for student collaboration.

Breakout Boxes: Student-Centered Activities

Location:  Beaver Country Day School
Audience: Middle School, Upper School
Presented by: 
Susan Timmons, Upper School Librarian (Harpeth Hall School)

Breakout boxes are fun ways to engage students in any grade or subject in hands-on learning. This session will examine resources at the Breakout EDU site, as well as ways to create a Do-It-Yourself breakout box activity. We'll look at several examples -- including a library orientation game -- and discuss tips and tricks for good game design.

Building and Moving Your Library 101

Location: Phillips Andover Academy
Audience: 
Lower School, Middle School, Upper School
Presented by: 
Emily Tragert, Library Co-Director; Talya Sokoll, Library Co-Director; Ella Steim, Teaching and Research Librarian (Noble & Greenough School)

Do you have a remodel, new library or move in your future? In this session we will relate what we learned from our own planning, moving and building process, which led to (and followed) the opening of a new library space on our campus in January 2018. We'll cover topics such as working with stakeholders, communicating your needs to administrators and architects, readying your current library for a move, planning and executing your move, settling into a new space, setting norms and rules, and navigating and capitalizing on the new attention your new space brings. 

Digital Reading Revolution: The Research

Location: Phillips Andover Academy
Audience: 
Middle School, Upper School
Presented by: 
Bonnie Barnes, Library Director (Memphis University School)

The reading process for all ages is under the scrutiny of scholars, parents, and teachers. Reading efficiency, individual preferences, the effects of screens on the eyes, and practical considerations will all be discussed. An annotated bibliography of recent research studies will be included.

Empowering Students: Junior Librarians

Location: Inly School
Audience: 
Lower School
Presented by: 
Sara Spencer, Junior School Librarian (The York School)

At the Junior School Library at The York School, students are encouraged to manage the Library by leading and completing daily Library tasks and selecting books which are donated to a lesser funded Toronto school. I will detail how to inspire, manage, and maintain Kindergarten to Grade 5 students to be reading role models and to assist students and staff in the Library. Last year, I had more 20% of the student population on their way to becoming Junior Librarians and Junior Junior Librarians. 

Engaging Students as Activists with Literature, Maker Kits, and Authentic Research

Location: Fessenden School
Audience: 
Lower School, Middle School
Presented by: 
Tricia DeWinter, Head Librarian (Oakridge School)

Today’s wide range of outstanding picture books provides educators with many opportunities to promote global activism and connect learning to universal issues. Come find out how to engage students utilizing circulating maker kits and hands on activities reflecting the message of global change. Takeaways: Books featuring worldwide issues of common concern, with follow up STEM and research activities that address positive change.

Harkness My What? Rocking Discussion-Based Learning for IL Instruction

Location: Phillips Andover Academy
Audience: 
Middle School, Upper School
Presented by: 
Ellen Cothran, Library Director; Penni LeMasters, Library Coordinator (Pacific Ridge School)

The Harkness Method, discussion-based teaching with specific norms and practices, comes to us from Phillips Exeter Academy and is rising in popularity among secondary schools. Even if your school hasn't adopted Harkness officially, discussion-based learning is a fun, deeply empowering method for putting students at the center of their own learning, and it fits beautifully with Information Literacy instruction. In this workshop you'll plan and practice teaching a discussion-based lesson direct from your own curriculum. You'll be provided with Harkness norms and practices (without breaking copyright), as well as hearty encouragement and 1:1 trouble-shooting. Discussion-based instruction is risky because we're not in control, and when it bombs, we can be left feeling awkward and lacking support to improve. You'll leave this workshop with not only your new Harkness lesson ready to roll back home, but also with a detailed template (print or digital, you choose) for embedding discussion-based learning in your students' and your own future.

Hosting Drag Queen Story Hour at Your School Library

Location: Fessenden School
Audience: 
Lower School
Presented by: 
Gili Warsett, Preschool and Lower School Librarian (Brooklyn Friends School); Rachel Aimee, Director of DQSH; Jonathan Hamilt, Organizer of DQSH (Drag Queen Story Hour)

Drag Queen Story Hour has become an international phenomenon and has also been met with controversy. Last spring, I organized and helped to present to NYC DOE librarians and independent school librarians about how to host DQSH in a school library. I was the first independent school librarian to host DQSH and as progressive as my school is, it took some battling to make it happen. All of my work to insist on the programming left me with a clear understanding and articulation of why I think DQSH is such a wonderful program to bring to schools and how it feels developmentally brilliant for our youngest learners. The learning objectives are to make clear what happens during DQSH, how it fits into a preschool and lower school library curriculum, to share resources for prepping, and to discuss both challenges and strategies to work with admin, teachers, and parents to run the program successfully. We will have a PowerPoint and plan to open up the conversation to attendees after presenting.

Librarians and Tech Directors: A Revolutionary Team

Location: Milton Academy
Audience: 
Lower School, Middle School, Upper School
Presented by: 
Audrey Imhoff, Director of Libraries and Academic Technology (Kent Denver School)

Whether your library and tech departments are a merged team or distinct entities, this session will help you answer the following questions. What do you gain when the library has a role in tech initiatives and innovation at your school? What specific ways can the tech team help the library and can the library help with tech services and support? How does this perspective impact hiring practices and job descriptions? Participants will spend time reflecting on their own culture and creating a concrete list of ways to engage each other in this important work at their school.

Libraries Without Borders: Supporting Experiential Learning and Driving Outreach Via the School Library – A Roundtable Discussion

Location: Beaver Country Day School
Audience: 
Lower School, Middle School, Upper School
Presented by: 
Laura Bishop, Library Director (Hun School of Princeton); Maria Falgoust: Librarian (International School of Brooklyn)

This panel will offer concrete ideas and strategies for initiating or creating both social justice programming and supporting experiential learning programming, inspiration for creating activist allies in our student communities, and a set of best practices for creatively and resourcefully leveraging the library in social justice and experiential learning initiatives.

The Library is Open: How to Reach, Serve, and Celebrate Your LGBTQ+ Patrons

Location: Phillips Andover Academy
Audience: 
Lower School, Middle School, Upper School
Presented by: 
Liz Gray, Library Consultant; Catherine McKenzie, Associate Director of Library Services (Santa Fe Preparatory School); Sacha Neesham, Teacher-Librarian (Montcrest School)

Sexual identity, gender identity, gender expression, and family structure are significant issues for most young people, and the school library should be a resource for them and for the adults in their lives. In this workshop, three queer librarians will describe how they have developed collections and shared them with their school communities; provide a sexual identity, gender identity and gender expression vocabulary; and suggest a range of resources for students of all ages.

Making Co-Teaching Stick: Assessing Library Instruction Without Reading Every Draft

Location: Beaver Country Day School
Audience: 
Middle School, Upper School
Presented by: 
John Byrnes, Upper School Librarian and Media Specialist (Christ Church Episcopal School)

This session will go through four different methods of gathering student responses to use to assess whether or not a lesson has "stuck" that can be applied directly and quickly. 

Making in the Library: A Collaboration of Librarians and Technologists

Location: Beaver Country Day School
Audience: 
Lower School, Middle School, Upper School
Presented by: 
Carrie Shaurette, Middle and Upper School Librarian (Dwight-Englewood School)

Over the past three years, the library has partnered with the technology center to host a series of maker events. My presentation would focus on the planning and implementation of the events, the events themselves, and the collaboration between the two departments. Some of the events we've had include Hack Your Wardrobe (using conductive thread to sew), Electric Origami (electric circuits on folded paper), Domino Rally, Rube Goldberg Creations, and a Sphero Challenge. We host these events in the middle and upper school library, and have invited some lower school groups to join us as well depending on the topic. My goal of the presentation is to share ideas about maker events that have worked well and to give librarians who haven't done something like this before a road map for how to go about starting a program with their technology team. Using a powerpoint presentation, I will break down these events in detail and show pictures of kids in action.

Making Research Fun Again!

Location: Milton Academy
Audience: 
Middle School, Upper School
Presented by: 
Bethany Martin, Director of Libraries (Trinity School); Karyn Silverman, High School Librarian (LREI)

In this session, participants will learn about different game mechanics, have a chance to try different styles of games designed to teach research skills, and, through discussion, think about how to apply the concepts to their own situation. It can be hard to teach what the AASL Standards refer to as curation, especially in a context vacuum or in the pre-search phase, but as librarians we are often called upon to do just that. This often strips the research process of the vital sense of fun and discovery by forcing the skill instruction to be purely about step-by-step process. By teaching research skills through game mechanisms, which are inherently fun, we can begin to restore that essential sense that discovery is fun.

Middle School Boys Like Reading??.....YES, It's True! (Or How a Community Read Changed a Middle School for Boys)

Location: Fessenden School
Audience: 
Middle School, Upper School
Presented by: 
Jennifer Dawson, Librarian and Makerspace Coordinator (Cranbrook Middle School for Boys)

Have you ever heard middle school boys are the worst library patrons? Or that they hate to read? Well...let me tell you otherwise! This presentation focuses on how to engage your whole school community with reading! Our faculty made it happen with middle school boys, but you can do it with anyone! This session will focus on how to start a community read program from the ground up; give ideas (everything from how to butter up your head to bringing in kayaks as decorations), provide planning materials and allow small group time to let the idea sparks begin to fly! 

No More Vanna Impersonations! Dynamic Guide-by-the-Side Library Instruction

Location: Beaver Country Day School
Audience: 
Middle School, Upper School
Presented by: 
Ellen Cothran, Library Director; Penni LeMasters, Library Coordinator (Pacific Ridge School)

How do we teach access and use of resources without coming off as spokesmodels or used car salesmen? Rest assured, there are real effective practical fun proven adaptable , and we'll practice them in this all-hands-on-deck workshop. We'll learn to chunk lessons into instruction and work phases, leverage flipped classroom techniques, illicit students' own in quick 1:1 conversations, and even best practices for engaging the classroom teacher in the process. Your specific needs are central to this workshop; we'll work directly with your challenges around engaging students in active learning while also communicating nuts-and-bolts content. You'll leave with a fundamental pattern (print or digital, you choose) around which you can build widely varied guide-by-the-side lessons rather than feeling trapped into the ol' point-and-explain routine.

Practical Ways to Protect Student Privacy

Location: Pike School
Audience: 
Lower School, Middle School, Upper School
Presented by: 
Meghan Murray, Middle School Librarian; Jill Maza, Upper School Librarian and Head Librarian (Montclair Kimberley Academy)

In this presentation we will offer practical ways to protect student privacy in the library PreK-12. We will first explore the broad parameters of privacy in the library. With both social emotional learning and inclusivity in mind, we will consider the ways in which student privacy can be impacted through circulation procedures, library communications, and digital resources. We will then work in small groups to discuss some scenarios and reflect on how librarians can help protect student privacy. Finally, we will share some of the simple and practical changes we made to our own policies and practices, as well as some of the bigger questions we are still considering.

Start Podcasting on Monday! (It's Easier Than You Think)

Location: Beaver Country Day School
Audience: 
Lower School, Middle School, Upper School
Presented by: 
Chris M. Young, Middle and Upper School Librarian (Metairie Park Country Day School)

Podcasts are more popular than ever. Learn how your library can take the lead in leveraging this medium using tools you already have (mobile phones and laptops) to develop new inquiry projects with teachers that demonstrate core media literacy skills while generating positive PR for your program. Even a simple interview, crafted with free tools like Ocenaudio and the voice memo app on your phone, can spark compelling conversations at home, capture the joy and learning in a classroom, and help to share your library's story. In this hands-on session, participants will learn how to record and edit audio as well as how to find and overlay sound effects and music. They will also learn best practices for teaching students how to take on these production tasks themselves, including lower school students who can lend their voices to librarian or teacher created podcasts. Resources with lesson plans and age-appropriate models will be shared along with ideas for podcast distribution. Come to this session a beginner and leave ready to start podcasting on Monday.

Supporting PBL and Design Thinking Models in the 21st Century

Location: Milton Academy
Audience: 
Middle School, Upper School
Presented by: 
Cait Levin, Director of Research and Media (Beaver Country Day School)

Project Based Learning, Design Thinking, and 21st Century Learning require a new type of library and, by extension, new library programming and best practices. This presentation will discuss how the Research Level of Beaver Country Day's new Research and Design Center adapts to serve the needs of a design-focused community. These needs include guiding students in their ethnographic research, managing technology as part of the library collection, and supporting a faculty with a curriculum that is ever-changing and technologically fluid. I will share what flexible rubrics/assignment guidelines look like in different disciplines and talk about how that work is supported by the R+D Center. 

A Tale of Three PBLs, or Three Librarians Rocking Information Literacy Lessons via Their Schools' Unique Project Based Learning Programs

Location: Fessenden School
Audience: 
Middle School, Upper School
Presented by: 
Katie Archambault, Librarian (Chattanooga Girls Leadership Academy), Lisa Elchuk, Librarian (Crescent School); Angela Finn, Library Department Chair / Middle School Librarian (Ravenscroft)

We all want to launch our birds from the proverbial nest, ready to make a difference in this complicated world. As educators, we work to hone the ‘4 C’s’: critical thinking, communication, collaboration, and creativity. This symphony of skills is difficult to conduct through the traditional research paper exercise. It is up to us to design and scaffold engaging experiences that address complex, real world problems; then we must give our kids the instruction and time it takes to fully tackle them. Project Based Learning (PBL) is where it’s at. In this session, you will hear from 3 librarians, each supporting their school’s PBL programs in unique ways. The topics are as varied as their approaches: upper school students researching the history of hip hop music, creating mental health documentaries, designing, building, and launching rockets. Middle schoolers researching endangered species and creating 'Choose Your Own Adventure' stories for the Tennessee Aquarium; researching global issues that have a local impact and creating a letter writing campaign to elected officials. Takeaways from the session: ideas for tried and true projects, different approaches to collaboration, research skill rubrics, and examples of authentic learning taking place on our campuses. Come ready to share your own PBL ideas, successes, and challenges that we can all tackle together!

Using Readers' Advisory to Create and Sustain a High School Reading Community

Location: Milton Academy
Audience: 
Upper School
Presented by: 
Angela Carstensen, Director of Library and Media Services (Sacred Heart Greenwich)

Learn how to use the concepts and techniques of Readers’ Advisory to build a community of readers. Recent listserv conversations demonstrate that many of us are struggling to persuade our high school students (and teachers!) to read for pleasure. I would like to offer solutions based on the research and writing of The Readers’ Advisory Guide to Teen Literature (ALA Editions, 2018). Half hour presentation followed by Q&A, interactive strategy sharing, and a paired exercise.

Visible Research

Location: Beaver Country Day School
Audience: 
Lower School, Middle School, Upper School
Presented by: 
Carolyn LaMontaigne, Head Librarian, Middle School (Collegiate School)

Want to learn about Project Zero’s Visible Thinking routines and how they can be used to create deeper engagement in research projects? This session will highlight some simple routines and strategies to help kids go far beyond copy/paste/paraphrase in their research assignments and move into true “conversation” with the information they discover. The routines are easy to learn and implement, and kids like them! (I seriously get asked if they are “allowed” to use them on their own for other work!) After this single session, you will be ready to try out a different kind of research project. I’ll also include an overview of Visible Thinking in general and ways it can be used in other types of library lessons. VT has been, by far, the most powerful resource I’ve ever used in teaching, so even if you can’t make this session, please seek me out for conversation and consider reading Making Thinking Visible by Ron Ritchhart and Mark Church!

We're Bringing Reading Back (Yeah)

Location: Inly School
Audience: 
Lower School, Middle School, Upper School
Presented by: 
Lia Carruthers, Lower and Middle School Librarian; Kristen Armstrong, Head Librarian (Gill St. Bernard's School)

In the words of Justin Timberlake, "I'm bringing reading back (yeah) / Them other boys don't know how to act (yeah)." Librarians Lia Carruthers and Kristen Armstrong will give you a plethora of ideas to "Bring Reading Back" to your school - it isn't just for the Library. How are you inspiring your students to read? What about your faculty? Parents? Jean M. Twenge has termed our students iGen: "The arrival of the smartphone has radically changed every aspect of teenagers’ lives, from the nature of their social interactions to their mental health. These changes have affected young people in every corner of the nation and in every type of household. The trends appear among teens poor and rich; of every ethnic background; in cities, suburbs, and small towns. Where there are cell towers, there are teens living their lives on their smartphone." So how do we meet our students where they are? Carruthers and Armstrong have a number of easy and fun programs and ideas to inspire a culture of free reading at your school - to meet your students where they are - to get reading into their minds - to get their minds off of their devices. This program will be designed for librarians of students from K-12. Participants will leave with ideas both instantaneously applicable and ideas for longer-term programs. Collaboration is our lifeblood, and we would like to show how we work with teachers, administrators, students and parents to promote reading. Kristen Armstrong is the Upper School Librarian and Lia Carruthers is the Lower School and Middle School Librarian. We will present our successes (and not-so-successful successes) and we will have time at the end for other librarians to share ideas they have about "bringing reading back (yeah)". 

The "What If" Scenario

Location: Milton Academy
Audience: 
Lower School, Middle School, Upper School
Presented by: 
Sarah Kelley-Mudie, Director of Southworth Library (Thayer Academy); Courtney Lewis, Director of Library Services and Innovation Research (St. Catherine's School); Laura Pearle, Library Director (Milton Academy)

If you won the lottery and immediately flew to Tahiti to begin your new life of ease and relaxation, could someone else pick up the reins of your library the next day? For all librarians, those new to the profession and those with years of experience, taking a new job means a learning curve as they figure out the unspoken processes and policies of their job. That adjustment takes time that can be better spent collaborating with faculty and establishing relationships with colleagues and students.

In this session, three librarians with over a dozen library jobs between them will help you determine the information, policies, and procedures you need to have updated and in place, whether you are preparing for retirement or just want to have a safety net in case of emergency. How these documents can be used to communicate the scope of your job with your administration and fellow teachers will also be discussed, with the end result of your colleagues having a better sense of the complexity of your work -- you’ll be prepared to win Powerball and start your new life knowing that “your” library can continue serving the community without a hitch! 

Schedule for Wednesday, April 3rd, 2019

7:00 AM - Breakfast at Royal Sonesta Hotel

8:15 AM ​- Depart Royal Sonesta Hotel for Phillips Andover Academy

9:15 AM ​- Arrival, mingling, and coffee!

10:00 AM ​- Breakout Session  (TBD)

12:00 PM ​-  Lunch at Phillips Andover

1:15 PM ​-  Depart Phillips Andover for the Boston Public Library (BPL)

2:30 PM ​- Boston Public Library tours

4:00 PM - Depart BPL for Royal Sonesta Hotel

5:00 - 6:00 PM ​- Board Book Social

Schedule for Thursday, April 4th, 2019

AM Schedule One:

9:00 AM - Depart Royal Sonesta Hotel for Inly School 

10:00AM - Breakout Session (TBD)

11:30 AM - Depart Inly School for Derby Academy.

12:00 PM - Lunch at Derby Academy.

12:30 PM - Depart Derby Academy for Fenway Park or the Museum of Fine Arts (MFA)

 

AM Schedule Two:

9:00 AM – Depart Royal Sonesta Hotel for Milton Academy

10:00 AM - Breakout Sessions (TBD)

10:45 AM - Coffee Break

12:00 PM - Lunch at Milton Academy

1:00 PM - Depart Milton Academy for Fenway Park or the Museum of Fine Arts (MFA)

 

PM Schedule (All):

3:00 PM - Depart Fenway Park or the MFA for the Royal Sonesta Hotel

6:00 PM - Dinner with a Librarian (optional)

Schedule for Friday, April 5th, 2019

AM Schedule One:

8:00 AM - Depart Royal Sonesta Hotel for Fessenden School 

9:00 AM - Breakout Session (TBD)

10:15 AM - Coffee Break

11:15 AM - Depart Fessenden School for Nobles

 

 

AM Schedule Two:

 

​8:00 AM - Depart Royal Sonesta Hotel for Beaver Country Day School 

9:00 AM - Breakout Sessions (TBD)

10:15 AM - Coffee Break

11:15 AM - Depart Beaver Country Day School for Nobles 

 

PM Schedule (All):

11:45 AM - Lunch at Nobles.

1:00 PM - Panel (TBD)

2:30 PM - Depart Nobles for the Royal Sonesta Hotel

6:30 - 7:00 PM - Cocktail Hour at the Royal Sonesta Hotel

7:30 - 9:30 PM - Skip Anthony Dinner, featuring Gregory Maguire

There's more to Massachusetts than Boston! Join us for a full-day (8:30 am--5:30 pm) excursion to the Pioneer Valley. We will visit the Mount Holyoke College Library Archives, spend a few hours shopping and having lunch in picturesque Northampton, and finish up with the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art and/or the Yiddish Book Center. The $80 cost includes admission to the Eric Carle Museum.

 

Schedule for Saturday, April 6th, 2019

Optional excursion with an extra charge of $80

8:30 AM - Depart Royal Sonesta Hotel for Mt. Holyoke College (South Hadley)

11:30 AM - Depart Mt. Holyoke for Northampton

12:00 PM - Lunch on your own in Northampton

1:30 PM - Depart Northampton for Eric Carle Museum and/or Yiddish Book Center (Amherst)

3:30 PM - Depart Eric Carle Museum for the Royal Sonesta Hotel (arrive at 5:30 PM)

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